Japanese scientists create microscopic noodle bowl

May 29, 2008 By MARI YAMAGUCHI, Associated Press Writer
Japanese scientists create microscopic noodle bowl (AP)
In this Dec., 2006 photomicrograph released Thursday, May 29, 2008 by The Nakao Hamaguchi Laboratory of the University of Tokyo, a "carbon nanotube ramen" in a bowl with diameter measuring one-thousandth of a millimeter (one-25,000th of an inch) produced by the university's mechanical engineering Prof. Masayuki Nakao and his students in a project aimed at developing nanotube-processing technology is shown. "We believe it's the world's smallest ramen bowl, with the smallest portion of noodles inside, though they're not edible," Nakao said. The microscopic bowl was first created in December 2006, but was only revealed Thursday after it was entered for a microphotography competition this month. (AP Photo/The Nakao Hamaguchi Laboratory of the University of Tokyo)

(AP) -- Japanese scientists say they have used cutting-edge technology to create a noodle bowl so small it can be seen only through a microscope.



Content from The Associated Press expires 15 days after original publication date. For more information about The Associated Press, please visit www.ap.org .

Explore further: Surface-modified nanoparticles endow coatings with combined properties

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Gold nanoparticles for targeted cancer treatment

16 minutes ago

The use of tiny drug-loaded nanocarriers for the safe, targeted delivery of drugs to designated parts of the body has received much press in recent years. Human trials of nanocarriers targeting pancreatic ...

Understanding spectral properties of broadband biphotons

4 minutes ago

Advances in quantum optical technologies require scientists to control and exploit the properties of so-called biphotons. Biphotons occur when two photons become 'quantum-entangled' - spatially separate entities ...

Recommended for you

Chemists make new silicon-based nanomaterials

Mar 26, 2015

Chemists from Brown University have found a way to make new 2-D, graphene-like semiconducting nanomaterials using an old standby of the semiconductor world: silicon.

Graphene applications in mobile communication

Mar 23, 2015

GSM, UMTS, LTE, WiFi, Bluetooth – to name just a few of the wireless standards that have become a natural part of mobile communication today. For all these wireless standards, signal processing could not ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Mercury_01
not rated yet May 30, 2008
it looks delicious.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.