Overweight in adolescence gives increased mortality rate

May 20, 2008

People who were already overweight in adolescence (14-19 years old) have an increased mortality rate from a range of chronic diseases as adults; endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, cardiovascular diseases, colon cancer and respiratory diseases. There were also many cases of sudden death in this group. This comes from a new study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH).

The incidence of obesity among children and adolescents has increased worldwide, but the long-term effects, both with regards to ill-health and mortality rate, are insufficiently documented.

"We found that increasing degrees of obesity among adolescents lead to an unfavourable development in the mortality rate from a range of significant causes of deaths," concludes Professor Tone Bjørge at the Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen and researcher with the Medical Birth Registry at the NIPH.

"Those who were overweight in adolescence, both men and women, had an increased mortality rate from endocrine (hormone system) and nutritional/metabolic diseases, cardiovascular diseases (especially ischaemic heart disease), colon cancer and respiratory diseases. There were also many cases of sudden death in this group."

Bjørge is the primary author of the article "Body mass index in adolescence in relation to cause-specific mortality: A follow-up of 230,000 Norwegian adolescents" that was recently published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

During 1963-75 the NIPH studied 227 000 Norwegian adolescents (both boys and girls) in the age group 14-19 years, using height and weight measurements. During the follow-up period, on average 35 years, nearly 10 000 deaths were registered in this group. Cause-specific mortality rate among people who had low and high BMI (body mass index) were compared with the mortality rate among people who had normal BMI at the start of the follow-up.

Source: Norwegian Institute of Public Health

Explore further: Physician/Pharmacist model can improve mean BP

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Turtle extinction event bodes ill for our waterways

20 hours ago

A number of distressed and dead turtles were found by canoeists in the Bellinger River on the north coast of New South Wales on Wednesday February 18 this year. At that time, it was reported by NSW Natio ...

Working with communities to keep drinking water safe

Mar 18, 2015

When we think about unsafe drinking water, our minds may leap to contaminated wells in developing nations or flood damage to sewage systems. It's easy to feel removed from these issues. Yet each year viruses, ...

Recommended for you

Physician/Pharmacist model can improve mean BP

20 hours ago

(HealthDay)—A physician/pharmacist collaborative model can improve mean blood pressure (BP), according to a study published online March 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Innovative prototype presented for post-ICU patients

20 hours ago

(HealthDay)—A collaborative care model, the Critical Care Recovery Center (CCRC), represents an innovative prototype aimed to improve the quality of life of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors, according ...

Clues to a city's health may be found in its sewage

23 hours ago

Research from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee suggests that sampling a city's sewage can tell scientists a great deal about its residents – and may someday lead to improvements in public health.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.