EU warns Google over photos on Street View

May 15, 2008 By CONSTANT BRAND, Associated Press Writer

(AP) -- The EU's top data protection supervisor said Thursday that Google Inc.'s "Street View" map and imaging feature could pose privacy problems if it launches in Europe.



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mrlewish
4 / 5 (1) May 16, 2008
I think these people are morons. They should embrace this. The Street view people should take the pictures every couple of years so a thousand years from now people can take a virtual tour through the ages.

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