A crash course in true political science

May 10, 2008 By SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer
A crash course in true political science (AP)
Paul Bunje a Californian who earned his doctorate studying snail evolution is photographed, Friday, May 9, 2008, in Washington. On Saturday he heads back to school to learn a trickier task: How to get elected to public office. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari)

(AP) -- Daniel Suson has a doctorate in astrophysics and has worked on the superconducting super collider and a forthcoming NASA probe. Now he's heading back to school to take on an even trickier task - getting elected to public office.



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superhuman
2.2 / 5 (6) May 10, 2008
Politics in its current form is one of the most disgusting, despicable human activities. Hitler, Stalin, Polpot, the worst scum in history were all politicians.
fleem
1.8 / 5 (4) May 10, 2008
These scientists seem to be under the conception that success in politics requires some sort of "knowledge". What they haven't learned yet is that getting elected simply requires one to regrow his hair, increase his height to 6'2", increase the tone of his voice to a deep mellow, wear business suites everywhere he goes, never admit he has ever been wrong, and promise a turkey in every pot and zero taxes.

See how easy it is?
DeeSmith
3 / 5 (3) May 10, 2008
Likely coursework:

How to Make Promises that Sound Good but Don't Count as Obligations to Your Constituency.
How to Deal with Political Lobbies for Fun and Profit.
Handshaking, Backslapping and Baby-Kissing 101
Good Ole Boy Politicking: Backroom Tactics.
How to Get your Special Interest Riders into the Addendum of Crucial Legislation - and Look Good while Doing It.
Tap-Dancing Around Issues: Avoiding Responsible Action While In Office.

Why do other nations have votes on Confidence in their Elected Leaders, but we wouldn't consider it here in the US??
ontheinternets
4.4 / 5 (5) May 11, 2008
I wish them success. I fear they're going to be branded by the opposition and complicit/asinine media as ivory tower elitists. This xenophobic tribalism will keep anyone worthy out of office and ensure that we get the same hollow, worthless, sycophants we're accustomed to. (yes, I'm rather cynical). Again, I wish them the best and I'd try giving them some votes.