Idaho team readies artificial beak for wounded bald eagle

May 05, 2008 By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS, Associated Press Writer
Idaho team readies artificial beak for wounded bald eagle (AP)
Beauty, a rescued Alaskan bald eagle, sits in her pen at a raptor recovery center near St. Marie's, Idaho, Wednesday, April 23, 2008. A surgery in May 2008 will provide Beauty with a new artificial beak, to replace the one damaged by a gunshot wound. (AP Photo/Young Kwak)

(AP) -- She has been named Beauty, though this eagle is anything but. Part of Beauty's beak was shot off several years ago, leaving her with a stump that is useless for hunting food. A team of volunteers is working to attach an artificial beak to the disfigured bird, in an effort to keep her alive.



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