U.S. to support some solar power research

May 01, 2008

The U.S. Department of Energy says it will fund up to $60 million to support development of low-cost concentrating solar power, or CSP, technology.

Under Secretary of Energy Clarence Albright said the five-year funding project includes $10 million in fiscal 2008 appropriations and $10 million in the agency's fiscal 2009 budget request.

Albright announced the funding in remarks to the Energy Marketer's Association Convention this week in Washington.

"Harnessing the natural and abundant power of the sun and more cost-effectively converting it into energy is an important component of our comprehensive strategy to … become less reliant on foreign oil," Albright said.

The funding is available for projects from industry and academia that develop advanced thermal storage concepts and heat transfer fluids to increase the efficiency of concentrating solar power plants. CSP systems use heat generated by concentrating and absorbing solar energy to produce thermal energy.

The funding includes a minimum 20 percent cost share by the private sector for research and development phases and a minimum 50 percent private cost share for final demonstration phases.

Applications are due on or before July 10. Additional information is available at grants.gov.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Future solar panels

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Future solar panels

7 hours ago

Conventional photovoltaic technology uses large, heavy, opaque, dark silicon panels, but this could soon change. The IK4-Ikerlan research centre is working with the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country ...

Recommended for you

Storing solar energy

Sep 01, 2014

A research project conducted by Leclanché S.A., the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Romande Energie and with the financial support of the Canton of Vaud could bring a real added value in ...

Scientists get set for simulated nuclear inspection

Sep 01, 2014

Some 40 scientists and technicians from around the world will descend on Jordan in November to take part in a simulated on-site inspection of a suspected nuclear test site on the banks of the Dead Sea.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

E_L_Earnhardt
not rated yet May 01, 2008
Better late than never!