Giant squid has world's largest eyes

Apr 30, 2008 By RAY LILLEY, Associated Press Writer
Study: Giant squid has biggest animal eyes in world (AP)
Museum of New Zealand technician, Mark Fenwick thaw out the largest known specimen of a colossal squid, caught in the Ross Sea, in a pool of brine in Wellington, New Zealand, Wednesday, April 30, 2008. Marine scientists in New Zealand were thawing the corpse of the largest squid ever caught to try to unlock the secrets of one of the ocean's most mysterious beasts. (AP Photo/NZPA, Ross Setford)

(AP) -- Marine scientists studying the carcass of a rare colossal squid said Wednesday they had measured its eye at about 11 inches across - bigger than a dinner plate - making it the largest animal eye on Earth.



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Mercury_01
not rated yet Apr 30, 2008
We knew that already, but cool.

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