Cancer fund promotes breastfeeding benefit

Apr 29, 2008

Three-quarters of British women are unaware that breastfeeding can protect against cancer, a survey by the World Cancer Research Fund indicated.

The group said 25 percent of women surveyed were aware that breastfeeding reduces a woman's cancer risk and only one-third knew breastfed children are less likely to be overweight, which increases cancer risk.

The WCRF recommends that mothers breastfeed exclusively for six months and then continue with complementary feeding after that.

"It is a real concern that so many women are unaware that breastfeeding can help prevent cancer," Lucie Galice of WCRF said in a statement. "This means that many new mothers are making choices about whether to breastfeed without knowing it can help reduce cancer risk for both them and their child."

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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