Review: Digital converters keep the old tube TV useable

Apr 23, 2008 By PETER SVENSSON, AP Technology Writer
Review: Digital converters keep the old tube TV useable (AP)
Graphic shows how digital converters display TV broadcasts in different formats.

(AP) -- Did my TV screen just shrink? That's the question a lot of people will be asking after installing one of the converter boxes that will keep their older TV sets tuned into over-the-air broadcasts after Feb. 17, when most stations will switch from analog to digital transmission. The National Association of Broadcasters estimates that 70 million sets are in danger of losing their picture.



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jburchel
1 / 5 (1) Apr 29, 2008
Screw this stupid crap. Why are taxes that come out of my paycheck paying for cheap people to upgrade their TV hardware? If you have an ancient TV, just buy a damn new one if you really want to watch it so bad. Life goes on without TV and maybe it would be good for some low income homes to stop watching it so much and read a book... They cost like $40 for a cheap one at Walmart anyway...
yeah
not rated yet May 14, 2008
Screw this stupid crap. Why are taxes that come out of my paycheck paying for cheap people to upgrade their TV hardware? If you have an ancient TV, just buy a damn new one if you really want to watch it so bad. Life goes on without TV and maybe it would be good for some low income homes to stop watching it so much and read a book... They cost like $40 for a cheap one at Walmart anyway...

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