Major surgery no longer needed for the removal of uterine fibroids

Apr 11, 2008

The treatment of uterine fibroids with 3T MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) is safe, non-invasive and effective, according to a recent study conducted by researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, NY.

“Approximately 25% of women in the United States have clinically symptomatic fibroids, and treatment has most commonly been surgical with hysterectomy or myomectomy. However, in the past decade, new options have been developed in radiology, includingnon-invasive MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) and minimally invasive uterine artery embolization (UAE) to treat these patients,” said Elizabeth K. Arleo, MD, lead author of the study along with Robert J. Min, MD, MBA, chairman of radiology at Weill Cornell Medical College.

The study evaluated 20 patients who had symptomatic leiomyomas and were treated with 3T MRgFUS. These patients had a pelvic MRI and completed a symptom severity score (SSS) of the uterine fibroid symptom and health related quality of life prior to the procedure and at 6 and 12 months after the procedure.

According to the study, at 6 month follow-up, there was a decrease in SSS (ranging between 10-59%), treated fibroid volume, and total uterine volume. At 12 month follow-up, there was a persistent decrease in SSS (ranging between 15-62%), treated myoma volume, and total uterine volume.

“In contrast to having major abdominal surgery with possible removal of their uterus, a patient can have a safe and effective, totally noninvasive procedure in an outpatient setting without the risks of general anesthesia, no ionizing radiation and a much shorter recovery period,” said Dr. Arleo. “Patients have returned to work as early as one day after MRgFUS, instead of approximately three days after UAE or six weeks after a myomectomy or hysterectomy,” she said.

Source: American Roentgen Ray Society

Explore further: Jobless and poor, Ghana's youth turn to selling blood

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Team improves solar-cell efficiency

4 hours ago

New light has been shed on solar power generation using devices made with polymers, thanks to a collaboration between scientists in the University of Chicago's chemistry department, the Institute for Molecular ...

Calif. teachers fund to boost clean energy bets

4 hours ago

The California State Teachers' Retirement System says it plans to increase its investments in clean energy and technology to $3.7 billion, from $1.4 billion, over the next five years.

Alibaba surges in Wall Street debut

4 hours ago

A buying frenzy sent Alibaba shares sharply higher Friday as the Chinese online giant made its historic Wall Street trading debut.

Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance

4 hours ago

Bent and tossed by the wind, a field of soybean plants presents a challenge for an Asian lady beetle on the hunt for aphids. But what if the air—and the soybeans—were still?

Recommended for you

The human race evolved to be fair for selfish reasons

Sep 19, 2014

"Make sure you play fairly," often say parents to their kids. In fact, children do not need encouragement to be fair, it is a unique feature of human social life, which emerges in childhood. When given the o ...

Non-stop PET/CT scan provides accurate images

Sep 18, 2014

Siemens is improving PET/CT imaging and data quality while reducing radiation exposure. The Biograph mCT Flow PET/CT scanner is a new positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) system that, ...

User comments : 0