Frank Tori named FDA chief scientist

Apr 09, 2008

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has appointed Dr. Frank Torti as its principal deputy commissioner and new chief scientist.

FDA Commissioner Dr. Andrew von Eschenbach said the newly created chief scientist position was mandated by the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007.

"Dr. Torti's impressive clinical and scientific credentials are an excellent match for the work we do on a daily basis to promote and protect the nation's health as a science-based and science-led agency," von Eschenbach said. "FDA's chief scientist will ensure that the foundation of the FDA's regulatory structure will always be state-of-the-art science."

A clinician, scientist and researcher in molecular oncology, Torti is currently serving as a professor at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C.

Torti received his bachelor's and master's degrees from Johns Hopkins University, his medical degree from Harvard Medical School and his master of public health degree from the Harvard School of Public Health.

He will assume his new post next month.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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