Professor warns against tight bras

Apr 09, 2008

A Swedish medical professor says young women shouldn't start wearing bras too early or they might develop sagging breasts.

Goran Samsioe of Lund University's Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology said everyday, natural movement stimulates the development of elastic tissue beneath the skin that supports breasts.

"If natural movement is restricted by a bra that is too tight, it can affect the growth of these tissues," Samsioe told The Local, Sweden's English-language newspaper.

The professor said a French study found that the distance between a woman's nipples and the ground decreased in women who wore bras.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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1bigschwantz
5 / 5 (1) Apr 09, 2008
I may have to volunteer my services in evaluating this crisis.
sheber
not rated yet Apr 09, 2008
Now they tell me??

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