Mojave Tortoises Moved for Army Training

Apr 04, 2008
Mojave Tortoises Moved for Army Training (AP)
This image provided by the Arizona Game and Fish Department shows a Mohave Desert tortoise in May, 1992. Scientists have begun moving the Mojave Desert's flagship species, the desert tortoise, to make room for tank training at the Fort Irwin military base despite protests by some conservationists. The controversial project, billed as the largest desert tortoise move in California history, involves transferring 770 endangered reptiles from Army land to a dozen public plots overseen by the Bureau of Land Management (AP Photo/Arizona Game and Fish Department, George Andrejko)

(AP) -- Scientists have begun moving the Mojave Desert's flagship species, the desert tortoise, to make room for tank training at the Army's Fort Irwin despite protests by some conservationists.



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ofidiofile
not rated yet Apr 05, 2008
"Fort Irwin lawyers and federal wildlife officials determined the claims were unfounded and decided to go ahead with the $8.5 million project."

Of course they did! Because FWS is an Executive department, no? And who's in charge of that branch of government these days? Move an entire vulnerable population to sub-optimal habitat? Go figure.

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