Heat From Data Center to Warm a Pool

Apr 02, 2008 By BRIAN BERGSTEIN, AP Technology Writer

(AP) -- A new computer center in Switzerland is making novel use of the hot air thrown off by its servers and communications equipment: The heat is being funneled next door to warm the local swimming pool.



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