Researchers perform multi-century

Apr 01, 2008
Researchers perform multi-century
Climate scientists used LLNL's supercomputer, Thunder, to run high-resolution climate model simulations.

Using state-of-the-art supercomputers, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory climate scientists have performed a 400-year high-resolution global ocean-atmosphere simulation with results that are more similar to actual observations of surface winds and sea surface temperatures.

The research, led by LLNL atmospheric scientist Govindasamy Bala, appears in the April 1 edition of the Journal of Climate.

The researchers used the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), which is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and Department of Energy. CCSM is a global ocean-atmosphere modeling framework designed to simulate the climate of the Earth. It is a comprehensive general circulation model that consists of complex submodels for the atmosphere, ocean, ice and land. In the earlier versions, spectral methods were available to solve the transport of water vapor, temperature and momentum in the atmosphere.

In the LLNL simulation, the researchers assessed the performance of a new dynamical method for atmospheric transport that was developed at NASA by Ricky Rood (a co-author of the study at the University of Michigan) and Shian-Jiann Lin of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The new method is called finite volume transport.

The Livermore team found substantial improvements in the simulated global surface winds and sea surface temperatures. Team members also noted large improvements in the simulation of tropical variability in the Pacific, distribution of Arctic sea ice thickness and the ocean circulation in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

“We found that this coupled model is a state-of-the-art climate model with simulation capabilities in the class of those used for assessments for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC),” Bala said.

The simulation was performed on the LLNL supercomputer Thunder, using about 500 processors or slightly more than 10 percent of Thunder’s capacity. The 400-year-long simulation, performed over a period of three months, was part of an LLNL Grand Challenge Computing project. This simulation, at about 100-kilometer resolution for the atmosphere, is the highest resolution multi-century CCSM simulation to date.

Under the same Grand Challenge Computing project, the researchers earlier performed a 1,000-year-long simulation corresponding to the climate of pre-industrial times that enabled the scientists to estimate the “climate noise” in frost days, snow depth and stream flow in the Western United States. The collaborative study between LLNL and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, which appeared in a Science article earlier this year, pinpointed the cause of that regional diminishing water flow to humans.

The present study is a collaborative effort between LLNL, the University of Michigan, Scripps Institution of Oceanography and NCAR. Other LLNL researchers include Art Mirin, Julie McClean, Dave Bader, Peter Gleckler and Krishna Achuta Rao (who is now at the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi).

Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Explore further: NASA sees developing Tropical Storm Halong causing warning

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Helping Native Americans achieve energy independence

Jun 19, 2014

Tiny wood-frame and dome-shaped hogans dot the landscape of the Navajo Nation's reservation in the Southwest. Around them are natural wonders such as canyons carved into the earth billions of years ago and ...

Thriving tundra bushes add fuel to Northern thaw

Jul 04, 2013

(Phys.org) —Carbon-gobbling plants are normally allies in the fight to slow climate change, but in the frozen north, the effects of thriving vegetation may actually push temperatures higher. In a series ...

Speeding the search for better methane capture

Apr 24, 2013

(Phys.org) —Like the Roman god Janus, methane presents Earth's atmosphere with two situational faces. As the main component of natural gas, methane when burned as a fuel produces less carbon dioxide than ...

Researchers discover new materials to capture methane

Apr 16, 2013

(Phys.org) —Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and UC Berkeley and have discovered new materials to capture methane, the second highest concentration greenhouse gas emitted into ...

Bug repellent for supercomputers proves effective

Nov 14, 2012

(Phys.org)—Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have used the Stack Trace Analysis Tool (STAT), a highly scalable, lightweight tool to debug a program running more than one million ...

Recommended for you

Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean

11 hours ago

As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water which is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle ...

New research reveals Pele is powerful, even in the sky

17 hours ago

One might assume that a tropical storm moving through volcanic smog (vog) would sweep up the tainted air and march on, unchanged. However, a recent study from atmospheric scientists at the University of Hawai'i ...

Image: Wildfires continue near Yellowknife, Canada

17 hours ago

The wildfires that have been plaguing the Northern Territories in Canada and have sent smoke drifting down to the Great Lakes in the U.S. continue on. NASA's Aqua satellite collected this natural-color image ...

User comments : 0