Poor kids 4 times as likely to be seriously injured on roads as rich kids

Apr 01, 2008

Rates of serious injury among child pedestrians in poor areas of England are four times as high as those among children in affluent areas, finds research published ahead of print in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

The findings are based on an analysis of hospital admission rates for children aged up to 15 between 1999 and 2004.

Almost 664,000 children up to the age of 15 were admitted to hospital during this period, of which almost 8,000 were for serious injuries.

These were classified as neck and thigh fractures, multiple rib fractures, head injuries, neural and spinal cord injuries, suffocation, and hypothermia.

Falls accounted for over a third of all admissions, and for more than four out of 10 serious injuries.

Transport injuries made up one in 10 of all admissions and for almost one in three of those for serious injuries.

Children living in the most deprived areas of the country were four times as likely to sustain a serious injury as a pedestrian as children living in the most affluent areas.

And cyclists, car passengers, and children who sustained a fall from deprived areas were twice as likely to be seriously injured as their affluent peers.

Rates of serious injury for child pedestrians were generally lower in towns and villages than in cities. But there were significant variations.

The rate of serious injury sustained by child cyclists was 22% lower in London than in other cities.

And children in cars were 50% more likely to be seriously injured in villages than they were in cities.

Serious injuries resulting from falls were 60% higher in London and more than 20% lower in villages than they were in other major urban areas.

Deaths from child injuries have fallen over the past 20 years from 11 to 4 for every 100,000 children. But steep inequalities between rich and poor remain, say the authors.

Source: British Medical Journal

Explore further: Teen vaccinations up but HPV coverage remains low overall

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Dog bites in US reaching 'epidemic proportions'

May 15, 2014

Dog bites are reaching "epidemic proportions," a well-known TV dog trainer said Thursday, as video of a cat fearlessly chasing off a dog that bit a small boy in California went viral.

Magnitude-7.2 earthquake shakes Mexican capital

Apr 18, 2014

A powerful magnitude-7.2 earthquake shook central and southern Mexico on Friday, sending panicked people into the streets. Some walls cracked and fell, but there were no reports of major damage or casualties.

US to require rearview cameras in new vehicles

Mar 31, 2014

The U.S. Transportation Department issued a rule Monday that will require rearview technology in many new vehicles—an effort to reduce deaths and serious injuries caused by backup accidents.

NIST tornado reports urge new safety standards

Dec 05, 2013

Nationally accepted standards for building design and construction, public shelters and emergency communications can significantly reduce deaths and the steep economic costs of property damage caused by tornadoes. ...

Recommended for you

Preterm children's brains can catch up years later

10 hours ago

There's some good news for parents of preterm babies – latest research from the University of Adelaide shows that by the time they become teenagers, the brains of many preterm children can perform almost as well as those ...

Mortality rates increase due to extreme heat and cold

11 hours ago

Epidemiological studies have repeatedly shown that death rates rise in association with extremely hot weather. The heat wave in Western Europe in the summer of 2003, for example, resulted in about 22,000 extra deaths. A team ...

User comments : 0