Scientists look to cut cow flatulence

Mar 21, 2008

Scientists in Scotland said they've found a way to cut greenhouse gas emissions by curbing cow and sheep flatulence.

The Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen said 60 percent of global methane formation is due to agricultural activities, with just under half of that produced by ruminants such as cows and sheep, the Scottish government said Wednesday in a release.

Researchers said the average cow contributes as much to global warming as a family car that travels 12,000 miles, The Daily Telegraph reported.

The scientists found that adding fumaric acid to animal feed can inhibit the production of methane that occurs naturally as part of the animal's digestive process. Tests of the feed additive on lambs showed methane production can be cut by up to 70 percent. The feed also resulted in lambs gaining weight faster.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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aufever
3 / 5 (1) Mar 22, 2008
I wonder if it has been tested on goats?
SDMike
not rated yet Mar 22, 2008
See: http://en.wikiped...ric_acid
Fumaric Acid, 500 mg, 90 capsules - Complete psoriasis relief Price $26.95
I gota try it and see if I can resign from the "Old F**Ts Club".

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