Space Robot Flexes Arms for First Time

Mar 17, 2008 By LIZ AUSTIN PETERSON, Associated Press Writer
Space Robot Flexes Arms for First Time (AP)
This photo made from NASA TV shows shuttle astronauts Richard Linnehan and Michael Foreman outside the international space station as they work on putting together Dextre, the gigantic walking and working machine on Saturday March 15, 2008. The robot's hands were attached to its 11-foot arms during the first spacewalk of Endeavour's space station trip. This time, astronauts aimed to connect the arms to the shoulders. The Canadian-built Dextre, which cost more than $200 million and was flown up on Endeavour, is designed to assist spacewalking astronauts. The hope is that the robot eventually will take over some of the more punishing chores, like lugging around big replacement parts. (AP Photo/NASA)

(AP) -- Astronauts flexed the giant arms of the international space station's new robot for the first time, testing the brakes and maneuvering the appendages into position for a Monday night spacewalk.



Content from The Associated Press expires 15 days after original publication date. For more information about The Associated Press, please visit www.ap.org .

Explore further: Why is Venus so horrible?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Yellowstone's thermal springs—their colors unveiled

35 minutes ago

Researchers at Montana State University and Brandenburg University of Applied Sciences in Germany have created a simple mathematical model based on optical measurements that explains the stunning colors of ...

North Korea behind Sony hack, FBI says

38 minutes ago

North Korea was responsible for a "destructive" cyber attack on Sony Pictures, the US Federal Bureau of Investigation said Friday, warning it would hunt down the perpetrators and make them pay.

Recommended for you

Why is Venus so horrible?

3 hours ago

Venus sucks. Seriously, it's the worst. The global temperature is as hot as an oven, the atmospheric pressure is 90 times Earth, and it rains sulfuric acid. Every part of the surface of Venus would kill you ...

Image: Christmas wrapping the Sentinel-3A antenna

6 hours ago

The moment a team of technicians, gowned like hospital surgeons, wraps the Sentinel-3A radar altimeter in multilayer insulation to protect it from the temperature extremes found in Earth orbit.

Video: Flying over Becquerel

6 hours ago

This latest release from the camera on ESA's Mars Express is a simulated flight over the Becquerel crater, showing large-scale deposits of sedimentary material.

Spinning up a dust devil on Mars

7 hours ago

Spinning up a dust devil in the thin air of Mars requires a stronger updraft than is needed to create a similar vortex on Earth, according to research at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH).

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

DGBEACH
not rated yet Mar 17, 2008
...a robot named Dextre, with a limp wrist...it figures
COCO
not rated yet Mar 18, 2008
I guess you have never seen the series Dexter - he is no wimp. Too bad the company who brought you Dextre and earlier versions is been bought by an Amerikan land-mine company - no doubt to build a Terminator and delay the need for a draft!

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.