Space Robot Flexes Arms for First Time

Mar 17, 2008 By LIZ AUSTIN PETERSON, Associated Press Writer
Space Robot Flexes Arms for First Time (AP)
This photo made from NASA TV shows shuttle astronauts Richard Linnehan and Michael Foreman outside the international space station as they work on putting together Dextre, the gigantic walking and working machine on Saturday March 15, 2008. The robot's hands were attached to its 11-foot arms during the first spacewalk of Endeavour's space station trip. This time, astronauts aimed to connect the arms to the shoulders. The Canadian-built Dextre, which cost more than $200 million and was flown up on Endeavour, is designed to assist spacewalking astronauts. The hope is that the robot eventually will take over some of the more punishing chores, like lugging around big replacement parts. (AP Photo/NASA)

(AP) -- Astronauts flexed the giant arms of the international space station's new robot for the first time, testing the brakes and maneuvering the appendages into position for a Monday night spacewalk.



Content from The Associated Press expires 15 days after original publication date. For more information about The Associated Press, please visit www.ap.org .

Explore further: Asteroid named for University of Utah makes public debut

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Big new iPhone brings Apple more profit

5 hours ago

Apple's largest iPhone is selling for $100 more than its other new model, but a new report says it costs Apple only $15.50 more to make the more expensive version.

Being sheepish about climate adaptation

5 hours ago

For thousands of years, man has domesticated animals, selecting the best traits possible for survival. Now, livestock such as sheep offer an intriguing animal to examine adaptation to climate change, with a genetic legacy ...

Recommended for you

Getting to the root of the problem in space

10 hours ago

When we go to Mars, will astronauts be able to grow enough food there to maintain a healthy diet? Will they be able to produce food in NASA's Orion spacecraft on the year-long trip to Mars? How about growing ...

The difference between CMEs and solar flares

12 hours ago

This is a question we are often asked: what is the difference between a coronal mass ejection (CME) and a solar flare? We discussed it in a recent astrophoto post, but today NASA put out a video with amazing graphics that explain ...

Scientific instruments of Rosetta's Philae lander

12 hours ago

When traveling to far off lands, one packs carefully. What you carry must be comprehensive but not so much that it is a burden. And once you arrive, you must be prepared to do something extraordinary to make ...

How ancient impacts made mining practical

14 hours ago

About 1.85 billion years ago, in what would come to be known as Sudbury Canada, a 10 kilometer wide asteroid struck with such energy that it created an impact crater 250 kilometers wide. Today the chief industry of Sudbury ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

DGBEACH
not rated yet Mar 17, 2008
...a robot named Dextre, with a limp wrist...it figures
COCO
not rated yet Mar 18, 2008
I guess you have never seen the series Dexter - he is no wimp. Too bad the company who brought you Dextre and earlier versions is been bought by an Amerikan land-mine company - no doubt to build a Terminator and delay the need for a draft!