Some Viruses Come Pre-Installed

Mar 13, 2008 By JORDAN ROBERTSON, AP Technology Writer

(AP) -- From iPods to navigation systems, some of today's hottest gadgets are landing on store shelves with some unwanted extras from the factory - pre-installed viruses that steal passwords, open doors for hackers and make computers spew spam.



Content from The Associated Press expires 15 days after original publication date. For more information about The Associated Press, please visit www.ap.org .

Explore further: Report: FBI's anthrax investigation was flawed

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Why the Sony hack isn't big news in Japan

3 hours ago

Japan's biggest newspaper, Yomiuri Shimbun, featured a story about Sony Corp. on its website Friday. It wasn't about hacking. It was about the company's struggling tablet business.

Hopes, fears, doubts surround Cuba's oil future

4 hours ago

One of the most prolific oil and gas basins on the planet sits just off Cuba's northwest coast, and the thaw in relations with the United States is giving rise to hopes that Cuba can now get in on the action.

Ancient clay seals may shed light on biblical era

4 hours ago

Impressions from ancient clay seals found at a small site in Israel east of Gaza are signs of government in an area thought to be entirely rural during the 10th century B.C., says Mississippi State University archaeologist ...

Off-world manufacturing is a go with space printer

6 hours ago

On Friday, the BBC reported on a NASA email exchange with a space station which involved astronauts on the International Space Station using their 3-D printer to make a wrench from instructions sent up in ...

Recommended for you

Report: FBI's anthrax investigation was flawed

23 hours ago

The FBI used flawed scientific methods to investigate the 2001 anthrax attacks that killed five people and sickened 17 others, federal auditors said Friday in a report sure to fuel skepticism over the FBI's ...

Study reveals mature motorists worse at texting and driving

Dec 18, 2014

A Wayne State University interdisciplinary research team in the Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences has made a surprising discovery: older, more mature motorists—who typically are better drivers in ...

Napster co-founder to invest in allergy research

Dec 17, 2014

(AP)—Napster co-founder Sean Parker missed most of his final year in high school and has ended up in the emergency room countless times because of his deadly allergy to nuts, shellfish and other foods.

LA mayor plans 7,000 police body cameras in 2015

Dec 16, 2014

Mayor Eric Garcetti announced a plan Tuesday to equip 7,000 Los Angeles police officers with on-body cameras by next summer, making LA's police department the nation's largest law enforcement agency to move ...

User comments : 6

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Doug_Huffman
not rated yet Mar 13, 2008
Chinese 'economy,' the gift that keeps on giving. Hmmm, no mention of WalMart, d'ya think they are excepted or censoring the news.

Do not patronize China's client WalMart.
RichManJoe
not rated yet Mar 13, 2008
I have often wondered how easy it would be for a government to plant a sleeper virus in PCs and cell phones for disabling or creating havoc in our communication system upon command.
Argiod
1 / 5 (1) Mar 14, 2008
"It's the digital equivalent of the recent series of tainted products traced to China, including toxic toothpaste, poisonous pet food and toy trains coated in lead paint."

Obviously, China doesn't like us as much as it likes our dollars. This is what you get when you ask your enemies to make stuff for you. Looks like China hasn't forgotten the Opium Wars yet.
superhuman
not rated yet Mar 14, 2008
@RichManJoe:
It would not be that easy, luckily there are quite a few software gurus out there who know theirs computers inside out and they would quickly rise an alarm.
For example theres no way currently to communicate over the internet in a way that can be hidden from someone who is monitoring the network closely enough.

We also have Open Source which is very valuable since it gives you a safe alternative which you can always turn to.
With open source you can compile your own OS (with your own compiler written in assembler if you are paranoid enough ;).
youknowyouloveit
not rated yet Mar 14, 2008
@superhuman:
Surely secure ssh tunnels mean you can communicate without the traffic being readable.

After that a network of proxies and pass-through servers could mean all but the most determined monitoring would not even reveal the fact there was a connection at all?
superhuman
not rated yet Mar 14, 2008
Yes, you wont be able to read the traffic but the fact that the tunnel is/was established will be plainly visible, you just need to log connections which isn't hard. Most firewalls will notify you of an attempt to connect to a remote server and will also log it.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.