Boy finds giant shark tooth

Mar 11, 2008

A 9-year-old Florida boy found a 5-inch-long fossil of an ancient shark tooth buried in the sand on an Egmont Key beach.

A park ranger on the island, located at the mouth of Tampa Bay, said the tooth belonged to a megalodon, an extinct relative of the great white shark, the St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times reported Monday.

The boy, Grant Johnson, said he first thought it was a piece of driftwood.

Megalodons, which have been extinct for 2 million years, were more than twice as long as great white --up to 60 feet long and weighing as much as 77 tons. Bob Hueter, director of the Center for Shark Research at Mote Marine Laboratory, said the ancient teeth turn up in "reasonably good numbers" on the southwest coast of Florida, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Ancient metal workers were not slaves but highly regarded craftsmen

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Ahead of Emmys, Netflix already winning online

4 hours ago

Even if it doesn't take home any of the major trophies at Monday's Emmy Awards, Netflix will have already proven itself the top winner in one regard: Internet programming.

US warns shops to watch for customer data hacking

4 hours ago

The US Department of Homeland Security on Friday warned businesses to watch for hackers targeting customer data with malicious computer code like that used against retail giant Target.

SpaceX rocket explodes during test flight

4 hours ago

A SpaceX rocket exploded in midair during a test flight, though no one was injured, as the company seeks to develop a spacecraft that can return to Earth and be used again.

Official says hackers hit up to 25,000 US workers

4 hours ago

The internal records of as many as 25,000 Homeland Security Department employees were exposed during a recent computer break-in at a federal contractor that handles security clearances, an agency official said Friday.

Recommended for you

Oldest representative of a weird arthropod group

1 hour ago

Biologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have assigned a number of 435-million-year-old fossils to a new genus of predatory arthropods. These animals lived in shallow marine habitats ...

Bronze Age wine cellar found

21 hours ago

A Bronze Age palace excavation reveals an ancient wine cellar, according to a study published August 27, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andrew Koh from Brandeis University and colleagues.

User comments : 0