Researchers Look to Spot Photo Hoaxes

Feb 25, 2008 By ANICK JESDANUN, AP Internet Writer

(AP) -- Sometimes, a photo is simply too good to be true. Tiny details in an image, for instance, may be too similar to have occurred naturally, suggesting a cut-and-paste maneuver. Or the color patterns may be too "normal" - beyond the limitations of sensors on digital cameras.



Content from The Associated Press expires 15 days after original publication date. For more information about The Associated Press, please visit www.ap.org .

Explore further: Watching others play video games is the new spectator sport

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Reducing water scarcity possible by 2050

31 minutes ago

Water scarcity is not a problem just for the developing world. In California, legislators are currently proposing a $7.5 billion emergency water plan to their voters; and U.S. federal officials last year ...

Danish museum discovers unique gift from Charles Darwin

3 hours ago

The Natural History Museum of Denmark recently discovered a unique gift from one of the greatest-ever scientists. In 1854, Charles Darwin – father of the theory of evolution – sent a gift to his Danish ...

Recommended for you

Watching others play video games is the new spectator sport

Aug 29, 2014

As the UK's largest gaming festival, Insomnia, wrapped up its latest event on August 25, I watched a short piece of BBC Breakfast news reporting from the festival. The reporter and some of the interviewees appeared baff ...

SHORE facial analysis spots emotions on Google Glass

Aug 28, 2014

One of the key concerns about facial recognition software has been over privacy. The very idea of having tracking mechanisms as part of an Internet-connected wearable would be likely to upset many privacy ...

User comments : 0