Seniors struggle with chronic pain

Feb 22, 2008

A Canadian survey found that more than one-quarter of seniors living at home and 38 percent of those in institutions suffered from chronic pain.

Data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey showed that chronic pain affected 27 percent of seniors living in households, compared with 16 percent of people ages 18 to 64, Statistics Canada said in a release.

For the household population with severe pain, 53 percent stated that it interfered with most activities. Among institutional residents in severe pain, 64 percent reported major activity interference.

Seniors who experienced an increase in pain over a two-year period had greater odds of being unhappy, regardless of illness or other factors that would contribute to unhappiness, the report said.

Chronic pain among seniors in private households was more common than diabetes, heart disease and Alzheimer's disease. In institutions, only incontinence, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease were more common.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: 11 million will lose health insurance if ACA subsidies are eliminated, study finds

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researchers create embryonic stem cells without embryo

Jan 29, 2014

(Phys.org) —Since the discovery of human embryonic stem cells, scientists have had high hopes for their use in treating a wider variety of diseases because they are pluripotent, which means they are capable ...

Recommended for you

Hospital acquisitions leading to increased patient costs

2 hours ago

The trend of hospitals consolidating medical groups and physician practices in an effort to improve the coordination of patient care is backfiring and increasing the cost of patient care, according to a new study led by the ...

Competition keeps health-care costs low, researchers find

2 hours ago

Medical practices in less competitive health-care markets charge more for services, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the National Bureau of Economic Research.

User comments : 0