Burmese pythons making themselves at home

Feb 21, 2008

U.S. biologists said Burmese pythons could start moving north from Florida into other states if the climate continues to change.

New climate maps developed by the U.S. Geological Survey show the invasive species is spreading from Everglades National Park in south Florida and could find comfortable climatic conditions in roughly a third of the United States.

One map shows areas areas in the United States with climates similar to places in which Burmese pythons live naturally. A second map projects these "climate matches" at the end of this century based on global warming models, which significantly expands the potential habitat for these snakes, the USGS said Wednesday in a release.

"Wildlife managers are concerned that these snakes, which can grow to over 20 feet long and more than 250 pounds, pose a danger to state- and federally listed threatened and endangered species as well as to humans," Bob Reed, a USGS wildlife biologist at the Fort Collins Science Center in Colorado, said in a statement.

Reed said pythons could have significant environmental and economic consequences if they were to spread from Florida to other states.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Tarantula toxin is used to report on electrical activity in live cells

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The spiralling cost of invasive species

Aug 28, 2012

Some aliens arrived as stowaways. Others were brought in deliberately, for fun or profit. And others were so tiny that nobody noticed them until way too late.

US bans import of Burmese pythons

Jan 17, 2012

The United States announced Tuesday it is banning the import of Burmese pythons and three other species of giant constrictor snakes due to the danger they pose to local wildlife.

Salt water alone unlikely to halt Burmese python invasion

Jan 04, 2012

Invasive Burmese python hatchlings from the Florida Everglades can withstand exposure to salt water long enough to potentially expand their range through ocean and estuarine environments, according to research in the latest ...

Recommended for you

Scientists see how plants optimize their repair

13 hours ago

Researchers led by a Washington State University biologist have found the optimal mechanism by which plants heal the botanical equivalent of a bad sunburn. Their work, published in the Proceedings of the Na ...

User comments : 0