FDA asked to drop soy health claims

Feb 19, 2008

A non-profit nutrition education organization has asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to drop heart disease health claims for soy protein.

The Weston Price Foundation submitted a petition to the agency Tuesday in response to the FDA's request for public comment on the issue. Manufacturers have been able to market soy as a "heart healthy" food since 1999.

"We have filed this petition because there was never a sound basis for a soy health claim and the heavy marketing of soy as a 'miracle food' has put American men, women and children at risk," said Kaayla Daniel, lead author of the 65-page petition that was officially filed by Sally Fallon, president of the foundation.

The organization, with headquarters in Washington, claims soy protein products aren't safe and have no long history of use in the food supply. The organization also claims the evidence on soy protein and heart disease is "contradictory and inconsistent, and no standard of scientific agreement has been met."

In addition, the foundation notes the American Heart Association in 2006 advised physicians that soy has little effect on cholesterol and is unlikely to prevent heart disease.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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