NASA revises shuttle launch dates

Feb 18, 2008

The U.S. space agency has revised the launch dates for space shuttle flights during the second half of 2008, necessitated by the delayed STS-122 launch.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration said the next two shuttle flights -- STS-123 on shuttle Endeavour targeted for March 11 and STS-124 on Discovery targeted for April 24 -- haven't been changed. Any decision regarding those launch dates will take place after the current STS-122 mission, aboard the space shuttle Atlantis, lands Wednesday.

Late 2008 shuttle mission revised target launch dates are:

Aug. 28 -- Atlantis (STS-125) to service the Hubble Space Telescope.

Oct. 16 -- Endeavour (STS-126) to deliver equipment to the International Space Station.

Dec. 4 -- Discovery (STS-119) to deliver the final set of solar arrays to the space station.

NASA said launch dates for flights to occur beyond this year haven't been assessed. Both shuttle and space station program officials are considering options for scheduling shuttle flights.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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