A map of the worm: First detailed anatomical atlas of C. elegans for use in the lab

Feb 16, 2008

To meet the demands of biologists who work with the model worm C. elegans in the laboratory, a new anatomical atlas has just been published. It is the most detailed and comprehensive atlas of C. elegans in print to date and will be an essential laboratory reference tool for all working worm biologists.

Derived from the acclaimed online WormAtlas, C. elegans Atlas is a large-format, full-color atlas of the model organism C. elegans, known affectionately as “the worm” by workers in the field. The WormAtlas Web site (www.wormatlas.org) has been a valuable resource for the C. elegans community, and this has driven demand for a print version that can be used at the bench and at the microscope.

The beautifully rendered images in the atlas illustrate in detail all of the internal and external structures of adult, hermaphroditic C. elegans. Each chapter focuses on a major organ system and includes accurate, color-coded drawings, detailed transmission and scanning electron micrographs, and fluorescent images, all of which are complemented with informative text and captions. It is a superb companion the monograph C. elegans II (www.cshlpress.com/link/celegans.htm>).

Since the 1960s, when eminent biologist Sydney Brenner established C. elegans as the premier model organism for neurobiology and development, substantial knowledge about the anatomical architecture of the worm has accumulated. Today, C. elegans is used by thousands of investigators in diverse fields, and it continues to provide a wealth of information about fundamental principles of biology that apply to all animals. C. elegans Atlas will be useful not only to neurobiologists and developmental biologists, but also those who work in the fields of reproductive biology, gene expression, and molecular biology.

Source: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Explore further: Researchers identify molecules that help cells to pinpoint their position

Related Stories

How to alert drivers to fatigue

24 minutes ago

Frank Black is a professional truck driver, having clocked up nearly three decades travelling the breadth of Australia. But every time he gets into his cab, Black thinks about driver fatigue; over the years ...

Killer bees test a double win for Australian honeybees

34 minutes ago

A genetic test that can prevent the entry of 'killer' bees into Australia and worldwide spread has been created by researchers at the University of Sydney and their collaborators at York University in Canada.

Rising carbon dioxide levels stunt sea shell growth

34 minutes ago

Scientists have discovered that stunted growth can be a genetic response to ocean acidification, enabling some sea creatures to survive high carbon dioxide levels, both in the future and during past mass ...

Protecting our rights to privacy and digital dignity

36 minutes ago

How many of us read the terms and conditions when signing up to a social media account or downloading a new app? And does agreeing to these rules offer us any real protection from big business looking to ...

Recommended for you

Norway tests out 'animal rights cops'

36 minutes ago

Norwegian police is creating a unit to investigate cruelty to animals, the government said Monday, arguing that those who hurt animals often harm people too.

High-pitched sounds cause seizures in old cats

2 hours ago

When the charity International Cat Care asked veterinary neurologists at Davies Veterinary Specialists, UK, for help with several enquiries it had received regarding cats having seizures, seemingly in response ...

Rare dune plants thrive on disturbance

3 hours ago

Beginning in the 1880s, coastal dunes in the United States were planted with European beachgrass (Ammophila arenaria) in an attempt to hold the sand in place and prevent it from migrating. The grass did th ...

How an RNA gene silences a whole chromosome

5 hours ago

Researchers at Caltech have discovered how an abundant class of RNA genes, called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, pronounced link RNAs) can regulate key genes. By studying an important lncRNA, called Xist, ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.