Tooth Scan Reveals Neanderthal Mobility

Feb 09, 2008 By ELENA BECATOROS, Associated Press Writer
Tooth Scan Reveals Neanderthal Mobility (AP)
A 40,000-year-old tooth is seen in this undated hand out photo released by Greek Culture Ministry. Analysis of the tooth uncovered in southern Greece indicates for the first time that Neanderthals may have traveled more widely than previously thought, paleontologists announced on Friday, Feb. 8, 2008. (AP Photo/Greek Culture Ministry)

(AP) -- Analysis of a 40,000-year-old tooth found in southern Greece suggests Neanderthals were more mobile than once thought, paleontologists said Friday.



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