British go under the knife willingly

Feb 04, 2008

An increasing number of British women and men are undergoing cosmetic surgery to improve their looks at a cost of more than $1 billion last year alone.

Figures published Monday stated that more men are receiving "tummy tucks" to reduce their waistlines and having breast reductions to get rid of "man boobs," The Times of London reported.

The number of British women undergoing face-lifts reached a record 4,238 in 2007, an increase of 37 percent over the previous year, data supplied by the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons showed.

Overall, the association reported that 32,453 elective plastic surgery procedures were carried out in 2007, 12.2 percent more than the previous year.

At the top of the list for women was breast enlargement followed by eyelid surgery. For men, nose jobs were first followed by liposuction and eyelid surgery.

Analysts said Britons spent more than $1.2 billion on cosmetic surgery last year while non-surgical spending on treatments such as Botox and dermal fillers was projected to top $2 billion this year.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: ALS Ice Bucket Challenge arrives in North Korea

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The Medical Minute: Doctor, why are my fingers curling up?

Dec 02, 2010

Dupuytren's (pronounced DOO-pwee-trens) disease or contracture is an abnormal, progressive thickening of the fascia of the hand (the layer underneath the skin). The disease is inherited, and a patient’s children have ...

New hope for better treatment for a rising cancer

May 13, 2010

Poor diet, too much alcohol, smoking and increasing obesity could be leading to an epidemic of oesophageal and upper stomach cancer, according to a leading UK team of specialists at The University of Nottingham and Nottingham ...

Selecting high-risk patients for heart screening

Apr 25, 2010

Using routine data from electronic patient records to select individuals at high risk of developing heart disease, rather than screening all adults aged between 40 and 74 years of age, is just as effective at saving lives ...

Recommended for you

Humiliation tops list of mistreatment toward med students

2 hours ago

Each year thousands of students enroll in medical schools across the country. But just how many feel they've been disrespected, publicly humiliated, ridiculed or even harassed by their superiors at some point during their ...

Surrogate offers clues into man with 16 babies

11 hours ago

When the young Thai woman saw an online ad seeking surrogate mothers, it seemed like a life-altering deal: $10,000 to help a foreign couple that wanted a child but couldn't conceive.

Nurses go on strike in Ebola-hit Liberia

11 hours ago

Nurses at Liberia's largest hospital went on strike on Monday, demanding better pay and equipment to protect them against a deadly Ebola epidemic which has killed hundreds in the west African nation.

ALS Ice Bucket Challenge arrives in North Korea

Aug 31, 2014

It's pretty hard to find a novel way to do the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge by now, but two-time Grammy-winning rapper Pras Michel, a founding member of the Fugees, has done it—getting his dousing in the center ...

Cold cash just keeps washing in from ALS challenge

Aug 28, 2014

In the couple of hours it took an official from the ALS Association to return a reporter's call for comment, the group's ubiquitous "ice bucket challenge" had brought in a few million more dollars.

User comments : 0