Claim: Wet sand causes digestion problems

Jan 31, 2008

Wet sand could pose a health risk for beach goers, researchers at the University of Florida said.

In a study published in the Marine Pollution Bulletin, researchers said people who stay in water and wet sand have a higher probability of having gastrointestinal problems than those who spend time on dry sand farther away from the water, the St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times reported Wednesday.

Sea gull feces and other fecal-thriving organisms could contaminate beach sand, which is not routinely checked for fecal levels the way shore line waters are, the study showed.

The study was conducted by veterinary expert Tonya D. Bonilla, who reportedly examined three beaches in South Florida during a two-year period.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Health care organizations see value of telemedicine

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Politics divide coastal residents' views of environment

Sep 16, 2014

From the salmon-rich waters of Southeast Alaska to the white sand beaches of Florida's Gulf Coast to Downeast Maine's lobster, lumber and tourist towns, coastal residents around the U.S. share a common characteristic: ...

Water in the Netherlands–past, present, and future

Aug 21, 2014

The storm in the Netherlands began on a Saturday afternoon in February 1953. Ria Geluk, who was 6 years old, told me that it peaked during the night when nationwide communications were on their nightly pause. ...

Scientists announce top 10 new species for 2014 (w/ Video)

May 22, 2014

An appealing carnivorous mammal, a 12-meter-tall tree that has been hiding in plain sight and a sea anemone that lives under an Antarctic glacier are among the species identified by the SUNY College of Environmental ...

Recommended for you

Health care organizations see value of telemedicine

Nov 27, 2014

(HealthDay)—Health care organizations are developing and implementing telemedicine programs, although many have yet to receive reimbursement, according to a report published by Foley & Lardner.

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

HeRoze
not rated yet Jan 31, 2008
Something else to worry about... not. Seriously, I can't beleive they resisted the urge to post numbers on the 'alarmingly high' amount of fecal matter. Sea birds crap near the sea, and always have. This logic applies to many over-hyped issues, as well.
DGBEACH
not rated yet Jan 31, 2008
...and what about the fecal matter from the fish...:)
Daryl
not rated yet Aug 11, 2009
wow

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.