Secondhand smoke exposure is linked to worsening of lung function for persons with cystic fibrosis

Jan 29, 2008

Exposure to secondhand smoke is associated with adverse effects on lung function among persons with cystic fibrosis, with this effect being worse for persons with certain gene variations, according to a study in the January 30 issue of JAMA.

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a fatal disorder that affects more than 30,000 individuals in the United States, with the major cause of illness and death being progressive obstructive lung disease. “Despite public health warnings, including a recent U.S. surgeon general’s report stating that there is no risk-free level of secondhand smoke exposure, substantial numbers of individuals with CF are exposed to secondhand smoke. Unfortunately, published studies have been inconsistent in associating poorer clinical outcomes in patients with CF with secondhand smoke exposure,” the authors write.

J. Michael Collaco, M.D., of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, and colleagues conducted a study examining several issues including whether secondhand smoke exposure is associated with worse lung disease and other outcomes in individuals with CF, and if the gene-environment interactions between the CF-causing gene (CFTR) or the transforming growth factor â1 (TGFâ1) gene influence the effect of secondhand smoke exposure on lung function. The researchers analyzed data from the U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Twin and Sibling Study, with missing data supplemented by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Data Registry. Of the 812 participants with data concerning secondhand smoke exposure in the home, 188 (23.2 percent) were exposed. Of the 780 participants with data showing their mother’s smoked during pregnancy, 129 (16.5 percent) were exposed.

The researchers found that secondhand smoke exposure was associated with decreased lung function for all measures of lung function studied. Also, socioeconomic status did not worsen the relationship between secondhand smoke exposure and reduced lung function. They also found that certain mutations in the CFTR gene determines the magnitude of the effect of secondhand smoke exposure on lung function in patients with CF.

“… CF may be a good model for uncovering gene-environment interactions that are detrimental to lung function. This study also raises the specter that healthy children bearing certain genetic variants may be at much higher risk for worse outcomes as a result of secondhand smoke exposure. Demonstration that genetically defined subsets of patients with CF exposed to secondhand smoke in the home have a substantial lifetime reduction in lung function provides potent justification for eradication of cigarette smoke exposure for all individuals with this life-limiting disorder,” the authors conclude.

Source: JAMA and Archives Journals

Explore further: Conjoined Brazilian twin dies after surgery

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Canada looks east-west to ship oil after Keystone veto

2 hours ago

After US President Barack Obama vetoed a bill to expedite construction of the Keystone XL pipeline Tuesday, petroleum producers are expected to turn to Canadian routes to ship oil internationally, but hurdles ...

Internet access limited in developing world

2 hours ago

Most people in the developing world do not use the Internet, with access limited by high costs, poor availability and a lack of relevant content, a Facebook report said Tuesday.

Manhattan Project physicist Ralph Nobles dies at 94

3 hours ago

(AP)—Ralph Nobles, a nuclear physicist who worked on the Manhattan Project and later led efforts to save thousands of acres of San Francisco Bay wetlands from development, died following complications of pneumonia, according ...

In Japan, robot dogs are for life - and death

3 hours ago

Incense smoke wafts through the cold air of the centuries-old Buddhist temple as a priest chants a sutra, praying for the peaceful transition of the souls of the departed.

US sees little severe weather so far in 2015

3 hours ago

(AP)—While a big chunk of the nation deals with snow and ice, the U.S. is poised to end January and February with the fewest bouts of severe weather in decades.

Recommended for you

Many transplant surgeons suffer burnout

Feb 25, 2015

Despite saving thousands of lives yearly, nearly half of organ transplant surgeons report a low sense of personal accomplishment and 40% feel emotionally exhausted, according to a national study on transplant surgeon burnout

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.