Doctors Report Transplant Breakthrough

Jan 23, 2008 By ALICIA CHANG, AP Science Writer

(AP) -- In what's being called a major advance in organ transplants, doctors say they have developed a technique that could free many patients from having to take anti-rejection drugs for the rest of their lives.



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vlam67
not rated yet Jan 24, 2008
The clinical progression and result of this case and this newest case http://www.physor...291.html is quite striking.
Digitalhurricane2k2
not rated yet Jan 24, 2008
This story (http://www.physor...71.html) has some similarity as the story with the Australian girl with switched blood type after transplant.
http://www.physor...291.html
Here it was done purposely but the case of the girl it was not. This man got his mother's kidney and bone marrow. Maybe both cases are similar and may be need to be investigated further. There are some questions that need answers to that may even let researchers and doctors understand what happened to the Australian girl's blood and immune system. One question is "Did she need to take anti-rejection drugs after the transplant like the man in this story (http://www.physor...71.html)he did not need to take any anti-rejection drugs?".

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