Proposed stem cell law draws criticism

Jan 21, 2008

Scientists are warning a new stem cell law in Britain will hamper research aimed at treatments for diseases like Alzheimer's and diabetes.

A group of 29 scientists, including three Nobel laureates, sent a letter to the government protesting a donor consent requirement for the use of cloned embryonic stem cells, The Daily Telegraph reported Monday.

The scientists say the requirement set out by the Human Fertilization and Embryology Bill moving through Parliament would deny them access to tissue banks. The banks serve as libraries of genes that trigger the serious diseases scientists want to study.

Much of the tissue currently stored in the banks was collected before it became possible to clone embryos so the patients would not have been able to give their consent.

"For scientists to clone human embryos without the consent of the cell donors, which contains the genetic materials, would be completely unethical," says Dr. Calum MacKellar of the Scottish Council on Human Bioethics.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: GMO mosquito plan sparks outcry in Florida

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Emerging ethical dilemmas in science and technology

Dec 10, 2013

As a new year approaches, the University of Notre Dame's John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology and Values has released its annual list of emerging ethical dilemmas and policy issues in science and ...

Community in the dark over nickel mine

Oct 08, 2013

A vulnerable Indonesian community has been let down by a failing legal system and international human rights mechanisms, according to a new report.

Recommended for you

'Tiger heavyweight' Nepal hosts anti-poaching summit

2 hours ago

Nepal's success in turning tiger-fearing villagers into their protectors has seen none of the endangered cats killed for almost three years, offering key lessons for an anti-poaching summit opening in Kathmandu ...

GMO mosquito plan sparks outcry in Florida

Jan 31, 2015

A British company's plan to unleash hordes of genetically modified mosquitoes in Florida to reduce the threat of dengue fever and other diseases has sparked an outcry from fearful residents.

Population genomics unveil seahorse domain

Jan 30, 2015

In a finding vital to effective species management, a team including City College of New York biologists has determined that the lined seahorse (Hippocampus erectus) is more a permanent resident of the we ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.