New NASA aeronautics research chief named

Jan 21, 2008

The U.S. space agency has named Jaiwon Shin as its associate administrator for aeronautics research.

Shin will be responsible for managing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's aeronautics research portfolio, including research in the fundamental aeronautics of flight, aviation safety and the nation's airspace system. Prior to the appointment, Shin served as NASA's deputy associate administrator for aeronautics.

"Jaiwon brings expert knowledge of aeronautics and technology to a critical position at NASA," said NASA Administrator Michael Griffin said. "He's helped develop the aeronautics research road map for the 21st century. His leadership of the directorate will assure our continued recognition as the world's premiere aeronautics research organization."

Shin previously was chief of the aeronautics projects office at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. From 1998-2002, he served as chief of NASA's Aviation Safety Program Office as well being deputy program manager for NASA's Aviation Safety Program and Airspace Systems Program.

Shin received his doctorate in mechanical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His bachelor's degree is from Yonsei University in South Korea and his master's degree is in mechanical engineering from the California State University-Long Beach.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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