Accident kills giraffe at Ill. zoo

Jan 21, 2008

Dusti, an 11-year-old male giraffe, was found dead at the Brookfield Zoo outside Chicago, after his neck got caught in a rope.

The reticulated giraffe was alive at his 4:30 a.m. check Saturday, but at 7 a.m. he was found dead, his neck at a 90 degree angle to his body, the Chicago Sun-Times reported Sunday.

The rope was part of a pulley system sometimes used to feed the animals that was kept between enclosures, the newspaper said. Zoo officials said they did not realize Dusti's neck could reach the rope.

Grief counseling was provided to Dusti's keepers, and the four female giraffes kept nearby were not themselves, the newspaper said.

The giraffe, whose natural habitat would be Kenya, was raised at Busch Gardens in Florida and brought to the zoo for breeding -- which he did, successfully producing three offspring during his 10 years at Brookfield.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Why do snakes flick their tongues?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean

7 hours ago

As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water which is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle ...

Underwater elephants

7 hours ago

In the high-tech world of science, researchers sometimes need to get back to basics. UC Santa Barbara's Douglas McCauley did just that to study the impacts of the bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) on cor ...

Recommended for you

Why do snakes flick their tongues?

1 hour ago

Many people think a snake's forked tongue is creepy. Every so often, the snake waves it around rapidly, then retracts it. Theories explaining the forked tongues of snakes have been around for thousands of ...

Boat noise impacts development and survival of sea hares

1 hour ago

While previous studies have shown that marine noise can affect animal movement and communication, with unknown ecological consequences, scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Exeter and the École Pratique des Hautes ...

User comments : 0