Some 20,000 soldiers a year may be trained with Sandia-enhanced simulation video game

Jan 08, 2008
Some 20,000 soldiers a year may be trained with Sandia-enhanced simulation video game
A user tests the new interpersonal skill building and cross-cultural awareness videogame technology Sandia researcher Elaine Raybourn and her team enhanced and recently turned over to DARPA.

Some 20,000 soldiers a year may soon be trained in interpersonal skill building and cross-cultural awareness using a videogame recently developed by researchers from Sandia and BBN Technologies.

Funded through Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the nine-month project resulted in the instantiation of Sandia’s adaptive thinking training methodology that prepares warfighters for difficult situations in places such as Afghanistan and Iraq, says project lead and scientist Elaine Raybourn.

“We are talking about training for nonkinetic engagement — interpersonal communication, negotiation skills, and interpersonal rapport,” she says. “The goal is to make soldiers better thinkers and communicators under stress.”

Raybourn and her team recently delivered DARPA’s “DARWARS Ambush NK!” to the Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation (PEO-STRI), which will distribute the enhanced system to the Army and eventually the other armed forces.

The training tool is conceptually similar to an earlier multiplayer simulation game she developed several years ago. That same game is currently used by members of the U.S. Army Special Forces to hone their skills in adaptive thinking, negotiation, conflict resolution, and leadership in cross-cultural settings. The Special Forces’ game is being used to train soldiers on a regular basis at Ft. Bragg in North Carolina.

Like the first game, the new one developed for DARPA will allow as many as 64 people to play on networked computers. Instructors can easily modify or create scenarios, monitor training, and jump in and change the direction of the game at any time.

Participants serve as either role-players or evaluators. Their tasks and experiences vary according to their role.

Raybourn says DARPA came to her seeking help in building the new game after it became aware of the one she developed for the U.S. Army Special Forces. DARPA already had a training game in the works designed by BBN Technologies. That game had a strong kinetic focus on physical aspects that could go wrong, such as improvised explosive devices going off or a convoy being ambushed.

“DARPA also wanted a nonkinetic adaptive thinking piece for the soldiers, to learn how to negotiate with tribal leaders, for example,” Raybourn says. “When things go wrong, troops have to learn to shift how they think in environments that are potentially dangerous.”

A major enhancement made by Raybourn to the existing DARPA system was the addition of a peer/expert evaluation element, she says.

“I found Raybourn’s idea of using a set of soldiers as observers and assessors particularly innovative and hope the Army can adopt it with its digital training tools,” says Ralph Chatham, former DARPA program manager who selected Raybourn to work on the project. “The Army is the only big organization in the world that has institutionalized introspection in their after-action review process [AAR]. Sergeants can talk back to lieutenants in an AAR, and both are pleased with the process. That part of the ATL [Adaptive Thinking and Leadership] simulation game Raybourn and the team produced fits the Army perfectly.”

Raybourn estimates that the number of people who could be trained with the DARPA-sponsored game could be “extensive—reaching soldiers in the U.S. and overseas.” PEO-STRI is putting the nonkinetic modules on its website where it will be available free to all U.S. military services, federal law enforcement, and government.

The nonkinetic modules are comprised of a socio-cultural overlay for a geographical area that is linked to key events and roles of host nation civilians.

Team members who contributed to designing the roles include subject-matter experts from the Fort Lewis Battle Command Training Center in Fort Lewis, Wash.; Pravin Rajan, a former Sandia employee and current U.S. Marine; and Alan Rolli, former U.S. Army and former Sandia employee.

Raybourn says that creating a serious game is “truly a collaborative effort that often involves pulling together a distributed, virtual team of industry, military, and government partners, just to name a few.” Game design teams often represent diverse cultural orientations and face the same communication challenges encountered by trainees.

“We hope this training will help soldiers better understand the cultural environments they are exposed to and better handle difficult situations,” Raybourn says.

Source: Sandia National Laboratory

Explore further: Technology to help people with disabilities to learn and communicate

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Game Lets Soldiers Train in a Virtual Iraq or Afghanistan

Feb 23, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- A training tool being developed by a research team from the Arts and Technology program may soon make it easier for military service men and women to perform their missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. ...

The National Guard takes on hackers

Jan 30, 2014

At home, the National Guard is summoned during natural disasters and civil unrest. Overseas, it complements the active duty military. Now, the nation's governors want to mobilize the Guard to take on a new threat: cyberattacks.

Recommended for you

BPG image format judged awesome versus JPEG

Dec 17, 2014

If these three letters could talk, BPG, they would say something like "Farewell, JPEG." Better Portable Graphics (BPG) is a new image format based on HEVC and supported by browsers with a small Javascript ...

Atari's 'E.T.' game joins Smithsonian collection

Dec 15, 2014

One of the "E.T." Atari game cartridges unearthed this year from a heap of garbage buried deep in the New Mexico desert has been added to the video game history collection at the Smithsonian.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.