Briefs: First cloned pigs in Denmark for research

Mar 18, 2006

Scientists at the Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences say they have successfully impregnated a pig with cloned embryos.

The cloned animals, expected to be born in Denmark in June, will provide valuable insights into human disease, lead scientist Gabor Vajta told MIDT-VEST.

The piglets will be used to study Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and other genetic diseases, reported the Copenhagen Post Friday.

Denmark's Parliament changed legislation last year to permit cloning of animals for research purposes only.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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