GM Envisions Driverless Cars on Horizon

Jan 07, 2008 By TOM KRISHER, AP Auto Writer
GM Envisions Driverless Cars on Horizon (AP)
In an illustration provided by General Motors all-around collision warning using traditional sensing is shown. Automakers and parts suppliers are working on similar systems, and GM Chief Executive Rick Wagoner will devote part of a Tuesday speech at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas to electronically controlled driverless cars. The plan is to use an inexpensive computer chip and an antenna to link vehicles equipped with radar-based cruise control, lane change warning devices, electronic stability control, satellite global positioning systems and digital maps. (AP Photo/General Motors)

(AP) -- Cars that drive themselves - even parking at their destination - could be ready for sale within a decade, General Motors Corp. executives say.



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earls
not rated yet Jan 07, 2008
Any day now. I'm waiting.
ShadowRam
5 / 5 (1) Jan 07, 2008
This will be the next biggest thing since the automatic washing machine.. It'll save everyone massive time... Stress levels will drop for hundreds of thousands of people, as they read or watch the news and relax while commuting.
plaasjaapie
1 / 5 (1) Jan 07, 2008
Ha! Ten years till they have a product. Meh! I think the real question is whether there will be a GM to build them in 10 years. Take a look at the new Aptera that's going into production down in southern California and you'll see what I mean. It's a sleek American plug-in hybrid that gets you 300 mpg on the highway and better than that in cities.
holoman
not rated yet Jan 07, 2008
Wouldn't this require a new dedicated infrastructure to support it.
Paradox
5 / 5 (1) Jan 07, 2008
As with any new and revolutionary technology, I predict that it won't become commonplace for AT LEAST 30 years(or more). Sigh.....
plaasjaapie
1 / 5 (1) Jan 07, 2008
Longer than that. They HAD this technology thirty years ago and never did anything with it. The big three has always been that way. GM was testing hybrids and stirling cycle engines back in the 1960's but never did anything with either. They were also using straight 6 engine blocks designed in the 1920's in pickup trucks right up into the 1960's. The world will be a better place when the big 3 dinosaurs finally go bankrupt and are broken up.
KB6
2 / 5 (1) Jan 07, 2008
I would have to be *very* sure that a driverless vehicle could correctly handle unexpected obstacles, like things falling from the backs of trucks, deer, children running into the street, etc. before trusting one. But if that could be mastered this would be a boon to many disabled folks.
Beav
1 / 5 (1) Jan 07, 2008
This is great. Still, It's just a distraction from a need to get off of OIL! First, it's time for all-electric cars. (GOOGLE Keyword "Dr. Warpenstein").
Fantasist
not rated yet Jan 07, 2008
Well, as with all elaborate and large systems, there is an element of randomness, which means glitches in the software, compromizing safety. I wonder if they're testing the network software too.