Telcos, CEA agree on video IP standards

Mar 16, 2006

The Consumer Electronics Association and major U.S. telcos have agreed on a list of standards for devices that plug into Internet Protocol video networks.

The standards are aimed at ensuring there are enough different components on the market to stoke consumer demand.

They included nationwide compatibility, open technology and reasonable testing and licensing requirements.

"In order to realize the full potential of this brave new world, consumers must be able to choose from the exciting array of new devices that attach to IP networks to receive video programming," said CEA President Gary Shapiro. "We believe these principles will provide solid guidelines and help support an environment in which IP video can flourish."

The principles were agreed to by the CEA and by Verizon, AT&T and BellSouth.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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