Japan to Apologize for Tainted Blood

Dec 29, 2007 By YURI KAGEYAMA, Associated Press Writer

(AP) -- Hundreds of Japanese who contracted hepatitis C from tainted blood products hammered out a deal with legislators Friday that includes a government apology and monetary compensation.



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