Online bullying taking a toll on kids

Mar 15, 2006

Bullies are found as much in cyberspace as on the playground, a survey found.

According to a study by Internet group MSN, more than 10 percent of British teenagers said they have been bullied online via instant messaging and e-mail.

Moreover, 44 percent of those surveyed said they knew of someone who had been bullied in cyberspace, while about one-third said bullies were actually hacking into the e-mail accounts of their targets.

Still, children are often reluctant to tell their parents or other adults about the threats they receive via IM or e-mail as they fear their access to those technologies may be curtailed or even taken away, which in turn would make them vulnerable to more harassment.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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