Utah teen named top high school scientist

Mar 15, 2006

The Intel Corp. has awarded 18-year-old Shannon Babb of Highland, Utah, a $100,000 scholarship for winning first place in the Intel Science Talent Search.

Babb joins a group of competition winners that include six Nobel Laureates, three National Medal of Science winners, 10 MacArthur Foundation Fellows and two Fields Medalists, Intel officials said during the Tuesday night awards presentation in Washington.

Babb conducted a 6-month study to identify water quality after observing carp thrashing wildly in the Spanish Fork River, The New York Times reported. "They were trying to breathe," she told The Times.

Babb analyzed the chemical and physical properties along the river drainage system and contends the water-quality problem can be resolved with a combination of restructuring and educating the public that household chemicals should not be poured into drains.

Yi Sun, 17 of San Jose, Calif., received second-place honors and a $75,000 scholarship for discovering geometric properties of random walks, a mathematical theory.

Yuan "Chelsea" Zhang, 17, of Rockville, Md., won third-place and a $50,000 scholarship for researching the molecular genetic mechanisms behind heart disease.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Study finds large racial disparities in how some school districts suspend students

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Living in the genetic comfort zone

6 hours ago

The information encoded in the DNA of an organism is not sufficient to determine the expression pattern of genes. This fact has been known even before the discovery of epigenetics, which refers to external ...

'Bright spot' on Ceres has dimmer companion

7 hours ago

Dwarf planet Ceres continues to puzzle scientists as NASA's Dawn spacecraft gets closer to being captured into orbit around the object. The latest images from Dawn, taken nearly 29,000 miles (46,000 kilometers) ...

Key facts on US 'open Internet' regulation

7 hours ago

A landmark ruling by the US Federal Communications Commission seeks to enshrine the notion of an "open Internet," or "net neutrality." Here are key points:

Spotify deals with random shuffle and we mortals

7 hours ago

How do we mortals perceive random sequences? An entry in the question-and-answer site Quora focused on a question involving a music-streaming service Spotify. That question signifies how we perceive what ...

Recommended for you

Predicting human crowds with statistical physics

4 hours ago

For the first time researchers have directly measured a general law of how pedestrians interact in a crowd. This law can be used to create realistic crowds in virtual reality games and to make public spaces safer.

Bribery 'hits 1.6 billion people a year'

7 hours ago

A total of 1.6 billion people worldwide – nearly a quarter of the global population – are forced to pay bribes to gain access to everyday public services, according to a new book by academics at the Universities of Birmingham ...

Broken windows thesis springs a leak

9 hours ago

The broken windows theory posits that minor misdemeanors, like littering or graffiti spraying, stimulate more serious anti-social behavior. LMU sociologists now argue that the idea is flawed and does not ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.