Laptop Project Enlivens Peruvian Hamlet

Dec 24, 2007 By FRANK BAJAK, AP Technology Writer
Laptop Project Enlivens Peruvian Hamlet (AP)
Raul, 9, uses his laptop in Arahuay, an Andean hilltop village in Peru, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2007. Doubts about whether poor, rural children really can benefit from quirky little computers evaporate as quickly as the morning dew in this village where 50 primary school children got machines from the One Laptop Per Child project six months ago. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

(AP) -- Doubts about whether poor, rural children really can benefit from quirky little computers evaporate as quickly as the morning dew in this hilltop Andean village, where 50 primary school children got machines from the One Laptop Per Child project six months ago.



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weewilly
5 / 5 (1) Dec 24, 2007
This is a great article. Yes there are going to be problems with maintenance and how teachers will be able to intergrate it into their classes but like every journey you have to take that first step. If they can connect to the world from these XO's then their horizons will have grown far beyond their known world. I wish this program great success and love the whole idea of helping youngsters this way. Parents and teachers will also benefit. Great Article.
Ashibayai
4 / 5 (1) Dec 26, 2007
I think they should come with a cached version of wikipedia or some sort of encyclopedia in their native language. Even if the laptops only last 5 years, that's five years worth of knowledge that the child, his friends, and his family can share together and will ultimate facilitate the idea that learning can be a powerful tool even in areas with less than fortunate economies.
mrlewish
1 / 5 (2) Dec 27, 2007
I see this as a huge waste of time and resources. The focus should be on reducing the poverty through education and cultural adjustment and not gadgets. It looks like we are giving them a lot of fish.
nilbud
4 / 5 (1) Dec 28, 2007
I'm awaiting delivery of one which I'll be passing on to my 5 year old niece. Anyone who thinks they're "gadgets" is wrong. Hopefully kids from disparate parts of the world will have tales of using the same laptops, as opposed to playing mario brothers or donkey kong.