Trouble for iTunes in France?

Mar 15, 2006
A man uses the iTunes Music Store to download music

France hopes consumers will use legal software to covert digital content into other formats by forcing companies including Apple to comply via revised digital copyright law.

Currently, only iTunes music is able to play on iPods, and if pushed to open its online music store, could mean that the mega giant may close its store in France.

The legislation, to be voted on Thursday, marks a pivotal time when digital rights management, piracy, and consumer rights continue to be debated.

This could also affects other online music store companies including VirginMega.fr, OD2 France, e-compil.fr, fnac.com, and Sony Connect but spells trouble for artists and recording houses.

However, the law will also provides penalties for those breaking the law, fining people who make files available illegal for download 150 euros and those illegally downloading music 38 euros. While, those found creating or distributing software illegal software face 300,000 euros and up to three years in prison.

While proponents of the draft law say that it will promote legal downloading, observers say it may signal weaker penalties in the fight against persistent piracy problems.

The law follows suit, after a year's of strong feelings from French consumer groups claimed companies including Apply and Sony forced consumers to purchase products tied together and lacked interoperable DRM.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: US spy agency patents car seat for kids

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

ISPs need to do more to tackle major cyber-attack

Jun 17, 2014

Warnings about the impending cyber-attack have gone unheeded and more must be done to tackle the threat of an infection, according to the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

When criminal evidence goes viral

May 19, 2014

Should we be able to watch a man being tasered to death? That's a question being asked by legal scholar Katherine Biber who is researching what she calls the cultural afterlife of criminal evidence.

Some facts about net neutrality

May 16, 2014

The Federal Communications Commission has taken the first step toward adopting new regulations that could create fast lanes for Internet traffic from websites that can afford to pay for the privilege. ...

Internet TV case: US justices skeptical, concerned

Apr 23, 2014

Grappling with fast-changing technology, U.S. Supreme Court justices debated Tuesday whether they can protect the copyrights of TV broadcasters to the shows they send out without strangling innovations in ...

Recommended for you

Microsoft unveils Xbox in China as it faces probe

9 hours ago

Microsoft on Wednesday unveiled its Xbox game console in China, the first to enter the market after an official ban 14 years ago, even as it faces a Chinese government probe over business practices.

Teens love vacation selfies; adults, not so much

10 hours ago

(AP)—Jacquie Whitt's trip to the Galapagos with a group of teenagers was memorable not just for the scenery and wildlife, but also for the way the kids preserved their memories. It was, said Whitt, a "selfie ...

Tiny UAVs and hummingbirds are put to test

11 hours ago

Hummingbirds in nature exhibit expert engineering skills, the only birds capable of sustained hovering. A team from the US, British Columbia, and the Netherlands have completed tests to learn more about the ...

US spy agency patents car seat for kids

13 hours ago

Electronic eavesdropping is the National Security Agency's forte, but it seems it also has a special interest in children's car seats, Foreign Policy magazine reported Wednesday.

User comments : 0