Brown researchers create first-ever HIV rapid test video

Dec 12, 2007

Researchers at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University have created the first educational video for patients to explain rapid tests for HIV, a relatively new tool in the fight against the AIDS epidemic.

The video gives an overview of rapid HIV tests, which can be administered simply with a saliva swab, a finger stick or a blood draw. Results are available in minutes. Brown researchers created the video to give health care providers and outreach workers an effective, efficient way to educate their patients about HIV and rapid HIV testing.

Conventional HIV tests require days of waiting for laboratory results, which is a barrier to testing. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that many patients don’t even return for their results: 30 percent who tested HIV-positive and 39 percent who tested HIV-negative in 2000.

In September 2006, the CDC recommended routine, universal HIV screening in all health care settings. The new guidelines reaffirmed the use of pre-test information to educate patients about HIV and HIV testing. Brown researchers wanted to see whether a video would help streamline the testing process and, ultimately, boost the numbers of patients getting tested for the virus.

“With HIV, testing is key: If you don’t know you have the virus, you won’t protect others or get treatment for yourself,” said Roland Merchant, M.D., an assistant professor of emergency medicine and community health at Alpert Medical School and an attending physician at Rhode Island Hospital. “The power of rapid HIV testing is that results can be determined in a single healthcare visit. With rapid tests, prevention and treatment don’t have to wait.”

Merchant wrote and produced the video, titled Do You Know About Rapid HIV Testing?, with colleagues at Brown and the Harvard School for Public Health. Abbott Diagnostics Inc., which distributes OraQuick – a rapid HIV test approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration – paid for a portion of the production costs.

Merchant and his team created the 10-minute video for maximum impact. It is animated and jargon-free so that as many adults as possible can understand the explanation of HIV, how it is spread, and how the OraQuick test works. The free video is available on the Brown University AIDS Program Web site so that any HIV test provider can download it to share with patients, who can watch it on a waiting room television or on a laptop or handheld computer. The video can be shown to individuals or groups in any testing setting, from an outreach clinic to an emergency department.

Merchant and his team also tested the video’s effectiveness in two randomized, controlled pilot trials. In an article published in BioMed Central, the peer-reviewed, open-access publishing house, Brown and Harvard researchers compare how well emergency department patients comprehended rapid HIV pre-test information using different information delivery methods.

In the first trial of 73 patients, some received no testing information while others received HIV pre-test information from an HIV counselor. In the second trial, also conducted in the Rhode Island Hospital emergency department, 120 patients either watched the video or got pre-test information from a counselor. All patients were then given a questionnaire to test their understanding of the pre-test information.

Researchers found that patients who watched the video demonstrated as good or better comprehension of rapid HIV testing fundamentals than patients assigned to the counseling group.

Merchant said a larger trial is underway. But based on these preliminary results, Merchant said the video could be an effective substitute for in-person HIV discussions. California’s Office of AIDS is planning to use a modified version of the video in its testing programs.

“The video could be particularly helpful in busy, resource-strapped testing settings, where there are a limited number of counselors,” Merchant said.

Source: Brown University

Explore further: Withdrawal from the evolutionary race

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Video doc helps HIV-positive patients reduce risky behaviors

Apr 09, 2008

A computer-based interactive risk assessment and risk reduction counseling program using a video doctor sharply reduces sexual and drug risk behaviors by HIV-positive patients, according to UCSF researchers who developed ...

SlipChip counts molecules with chemistry and a cell phone

Nov 18, 2013

(Phys.org) —In developing nations, rural areas, and even one's own home, limited access to expensive equipment and trained medical professionals can impede the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Many qualitative ...

Cell phone camera photographs microscopic cell samples

Apr 11, 2013

On April 11th JoVE (Journal of Visualized Experiments) will publish a new video article by Dr. Aydogan Ozcan demonstrating how a cell phone camera can capture images from a fluorescent microscope and flow cytometer, whic ...

Seniors' sex lives are up -- and so are STD cases

May 17, 2011

Across the nation, and especially in communities that attract a lot of older Americans, the free-love generation is continuing to enjoy an active - if not always healthy - sex life.

Microsponges from seaweed may save lives (w/ Video)

Feb 09, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Microsponges derived from seaweed may help diagnose heart disease, cancers, HIV and other diseases quickly and at far lower cost than current clinical methods. The microsponges are an essential ...

Recommended for you

Withdrawal from the evolutionary race

12 hours ago

In some HIV sufferers, the immune system does not fight off the immune deficiency virus. Instead, the body tolerates the pathogen. A research team headed by ETH Zurich has now determined how strongly patients ...

The genetics of coping with HIV

Sep 16, 2014

We respond to infections in two fundamental ways. One, which has been the subject of intensive research over the years, is "resistance," where the body attacks the invading pathogen and reduces its numbers. Another, which ...

Long acting HIV drugs to be developed

Sep 11, 2014

HIV drugs which only need to be taken once a month are to be developed at the University of Liverpool in a bid to overcome the problem of 'pill fatigue'.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

jamhotion
not rated yet Apr 04, 2008
How To Use "HIV Home Test Kit"

The Home HIV Test System is a test to determine the presence of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) in Human Blood. HIV Home Test Kit is the same test approved for and used in hospitals and clinics nationwide to test for HIV. Rather than you having to go to a clinic or hospital to test and wait days before test result, the HIV Home Test Kit provides private at-home HIV testing with fast and reliable result, and at a time when you needed to know the most!

Hey, I know a website can test hiv in
home.
Get a personal and private results less than 15 minute.
This website name is HivHomeTests.
www.hivhometests.org.
I order two kit at apr 13 ,so easy to used :)
jamhotion
not rated yet Apr 04, 2008
HIV TEST IBCLUDED
HIV RAPID TEST SYSTEM (RAPID TEST KIT)
HIV ELISA TEST SYSTEM (ELISA)
HIV PRC TEST SYSTEM (IT TEST HOW MANY HIV VIRUS IN BLOOD)
HIV DNA TEST SYSTEM (IT TEST HIV VIRUS DNA COPY IN BLOOD)

BLOOD IS VERY ACCURATE FOR HIV TEST.
ORAL TEST IS NOT CAN TRUST.
WELCOME TO WWW.HIVHOMETESTS.ORG
FIND YOUR SOLUTION FOR HEALTH.