Briefs: Scientists still at odds over cloned sheep

Mar 12, 2006

There's a three- or four-way dispute among British scientists about who deserves the credit for Dolly, the first cloned sheep.

Ian Wilmut of the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland, who became famous thanks to Dolly, told an employment tribunal that he was only a supervisor and did not develop the cloning technology, The Guardian reported. Wilmut claimed some of the credit for himself but said that 66 percent should go to Professor Keith Campbell, who was a co-author of the Nature paper that described the cloning.

The tribunal is hearing a complaint by Prim Singh, a Wilmut colleague, that he was bullied.

A source told The Guardian that Campbell was totally responsible for Dolly. Campbell left the institute soon after the paper was published in 1997.

Bill Ritchie, a Roslin lab technician, argues that he and another technician, Karen Mycook, did all the work and should get all the credit.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Changing dinosaur tracks spurs novel approach

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Gene by gene, scientists dig for the triggers

Jan 02, 2009

James Thomson knew that to send a cell back to its past was no trivial matter. Like generations of biologists, the University of Wisconsin-Madison stem cell pioneer had been taught that development was a one-way street; it ...

Petition seeks voiding of Wilmut's title

Feb 01, 2008

A petition has called on Britain's Queen Elizabeth II to take away the knighthood she bestowed on Ian Wilmut for his cloning of the sheep Dolly.

Recommended for you

Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

11 hours ago

A statistical analysis of the gift "fulfillments" at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the ...

Can new understanding avert tragedy?

14 hours ago

As a boy growing up in Syracuse, NY, Sol Hsiang ran an experiment for a school project testing whether plants grow better sprinkled with water vs orange juice. Today, 20 years later, he applies complex statistical ...

Crowd-sourcing Britain's Bronze Age

14 hours ago

A new joint project by the British Museum and the UCL Institute of Archaeology is seeking online contributions from members of the public to enhance a major British Bronze Age archive and artefact collection.

Roman dig 'transforms understanding' of ancient port

14 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Researchers from the universities of Cambridge and Southampton have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

A statistical analysis of the gift "fulfillments" at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the ...

Can new understanding avert tragedy?

As a boy growing up in Syracuse, NY, Sol Hsiang ran an experiment for a school project testing whether plants grow better sprinkled with water vs orange juice. Today, 20 years later, he applies complex statistical ...

Roman dig 'transforms understanding' of ancient port

(Phys.org) —Researchers from the universities of Cambridge and Southampton have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously ...

Crowd-sourcing Britain's Bronze Age

A new joint project by the British Museum and the UCL Institute of Archaeology is seeking online contributions from members of the public to enhance a major British Bronze Age archive and artefact collection.

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...