Briefs: Scientists still at odds over cloned sheep

Mar 12, 2006

There's a three- or four-way dispute among British scientists about who deserves the credit for Dolly, the first cloned sheep.

Ian Wilmut of the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland, who became famous thanks to Dolly, told an employment tribunal that he was only a supervisor and did not develop the cloning technology, The Guardian reported. Wilmut claimed some of the credit for himself but said that 66 percent should go to Professor Keith Campbell, who was a co-author of the Nature paper that described the cloning.

The tribunal is hearing a complaint by Prim Singh, a Wilmut colleague, that he was bullied.

A source told The Guardian that Campbell was totally responsible for Dolly. Campbell left the institute soon after the paper was published in 1997.

Bill Ritchie, a Roslin lab technician, argues that he and another technician, Karen Mycook, did all the work and should get all the credit.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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