Scientists: Seaweed Could Stem Warming

Dec 08, 2007 By JOSEPH COLEMAN, Associated Press Writer
Group Touts Seaweed As Warming Weapon (AP)
An Indonesian woman tends to her seaweed farm off the beach Thursday Dec. 6, 2007 in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia. Slimy, green and unsightly, seaweed and algae are among the humblest plants on earth, but a group of scientists at a climate conference in Bali say they could also be a potent weapon against global warming, sucking damaging carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere at greater rates than the mightiest rain forests. (AP Photo/Ed Wray)

(AP) -- Slimy, green and unsightly, seaweed and algae are among the humblest of plants. A group of scientists at a climate conference in Bali say they could also be a potent weapon against global warming, capable of sucking damaging carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere at rates comparable to the mightiest rain forests.



Content from The Associated Press expires 15 days after original publication date. For more information about The Associated Press, please visit www.ap.org .

Explore further: Developing a sustainable living may require urban agriculture

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Obama unveils new measures to stem identity theft

1 hour ago

US President Barack Obama on Friday ordered "pin and chip" security measures for government payment systems, aiming to stem the proliferation of credit card fraud and identity theft.

Twitpic to shutter service after all

2 hours ago

Twitpic on Friday put out word that the service is shutting down after all, apologizing for a "false alarm" that a merger would be its salvation.

Microsoft CEO launches diversity training effort

3 hours ago

(AP)—Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has again apologized to employees and announced in a company-wide memo that all workers will receive expanded training on how to foster an inclusive culture as he works to repair damage ...

Recommended for you

Study shows no lead pollution in oilsands region

4 hours ago

New research from a world-renowned soil and water expert at the University of Alberta reveals that there's no atmospheric lead pollution in Alberta's oilsands region—a finding that contradicts current scientific ...

User comments : 0