Electricity Revives Bali Coral Reefs

Dec 05, 2007 By JOSEPH COLEMAN, Associated Press Writer
Electricity Revives Bali Coral Reefs (AP)
Fish swim around corals growing on a metal structures submerged by conservationists and fed by electrical cables linked to the shoreline in Pemuteran bay, Bali, Indonesia, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2007. As thousands of delegates, experts, and activists debate climate at a massive conference that opened Monday in southern Bali, the coral restoration project across the island illustrates the creative ways scientists are attacking the ill-effects of global warming. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

(AP) -- Just a few years ago, the lush coral reefs off Bali island were dying out, bleached by rising temperatures, blasted by dynamite fishing and poisoned by cyanide. Now they are coming back, thanks to an unlikely remedy: electricity.



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