Indonesia Hosting Global Warming Talks

Dec 02, 2007 By MICHAEL CASEY, AP Environmental Writer
Indonesia Hosting Global Warming Talks (AP)
An Indonesian student plants a sapling during the launch of a tree-planting campaign ahead of Bali Climate Conference in Cibubur on the outskirts of Jakarta, Indonesia, Saturday, Dec. 1, 2007. Delegates from 190 countries gather on the resort island of Bali over the next two weeks to try to head off a scientific forecast of catastrophic floods and droughts, melting ice caps, disappearing coastlines and deadly heat waves as they begin negotiations on a successor to the Kyoto Protocol, which expires in 2012. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

(AP) -- Government leaders started arriving Sunday for what are expected to be lengthy and contentious negotiations on how to fight global warming, which could cause devastating sea level rises, send millions further into poverty and lead to the mass extinction of animals.



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mikiwud
not rated yet Dec 03, 2007
Don't worry,blast all that CO2 into the air getting there and the POOR tax payer will fund it!The low paid in the UK are green taxed into abject poverty and the Australians are next.Didn't you learn ANYTHING from Bliar and Broon!?
The poor in the world can not afford this con.
The better off can,so can tollerate it.
The rich get richer,ask Gorebbels.