Fluoride demand creating shortages

Nov 30, 2007

A fluoride shortage in the United States and Canada forced Fort Worth, Texas, to go almost two months without putting any in the public drinking water supply.

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram said the city has found a short-term supplier who delivered the first two shipments of fluoride this week. Fluoride levels were expected to back to normal by Friday.

The shortage is attributed to Hurricane Katrina's disruption of production of the phosphate fertilizers that are the source of most of the fluoride used in drinking water. Rising demand has also tapped out some phosphate mining operations, the newspaper said.

The tight supplies have driven up the cost. The newspaper said Fort Worth paid $560 a ton for the fluoride it received this week, more than twice the normal price.

The American Dental Association said fluoride is credited with reducing tooth decay by as much as 60 percent since World War II.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Radiologist recommendations for chest CT have high clinical yield

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A look at North Korea's limited Internet capabilities

2 hours ago

An hours-long Internet outage Tuesday in one of the world's least-wired countries was probably more inconvenient to foreigners than to North Korean residents, most of whom have never gone online. Even for wired Koreans south ...

Valles Caldera looks to future as national park

2 hours ago

The management experiment at Valles Caldera National Preserve is coming to an end as the National Park Service prepares to take over the 140-square-mile property in northern New Mexico.

Putin oversees successful rocket launch (Update)

2 hours ago

President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday oversaw the successful test-launch of Russia's newest heavy-class Angara rocket, a rare piece of good news in a week dominated by the economic crisis.

As dust clears, what's next for Sony?

12 hours ago

The Sony hacking attack continues to deliver more dramatic plotlines than any fictional movie, but meanwhile the movie studio must move forward and tackle the next steps in minimizing the mess. Will Sony ...

Recommended for you

Obese British man in court fight for surgery

Jul 11, 2011

A British man weighing 22 stone (139 kilograms, 306 pounds) launched a court appeal Monday against a decision to refuse him state-funded obesity surgery because he is not fat enough.

2008 crisis spurred rise in suicides in Europe

Jul 08, 2011

The financial crisis that began to hit Europe in mid-2008 reversed a steady, years-long fall in suicides among people of working age, according to a letter published on Friday by The Lancet.

New food labels dished up to keep Europe healthy

Jul 06, 2011

A groundbreaking deal on compulsory new food labels Wednesday is set to give Europeans clear information on the nutritional and energy content of products, as well as country of origin.

Overweight men have poorer sperm count

Jul 04, 2011

Overweight or obese men, like their female counterparts, have a lower chance of becoming a parent, according to a comparison of sperm quality presented at a European fertility meeting Monday.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

nyscof
1 / 5 (1) Dec 01, 2007
Modern science shows that adding fluoride chemicals into the drinking water is ineffective at reducing tooth decay, harmful to health and a waste of tax dollars.

Take Action to End Fluoridation at
http://www.FluorideAction.Net.

1200 Professionals signed a statement calling for an end to water fluoridation and the beginning of Congressional hearings to discern why government employees keep pushing fluoridation in the face of mounting evidence of harm

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.