Fluoride demand creating shortages

Nov 30, 2007

A fluoride shortage in the United States and Canada forced Fort Worth, Texas, to go almost two months without putting any in the public drinking water supply.

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram said the city has found a short-term supplier who delivered the first two shipments of fluoride this week. Fluoride levels were expected to back to normal by Friday.

The shortage is attributed to Hurricane Katrina's disruption of production of the phosphate fertilizers that are the source of most of the fluoride used in drinking water. Rising demand has also tapped out some phosphate mining operations, the newspaper said.

The tight supplies have driven up the cost. The newspaper said Fort Worth paid $560 a ton for the fluoride it received this week, more than twice the normal price.

The American Dental Association said fluoride is credited with reducing tooth decay by as much as 60 percent since World War II.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: World's first wearable blue LED light therapy device to treat skin disease psoriasis vulgaris

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Europe sat-nav launch glitch linked to frozen pipe

3 minutes ago

A frozen fuel pipe in the upper stage of a Soyuz launcher likely caused the failure last month to place two European navigation satellites in orbit, a source close to the inquiry said Wednesday.

New frontier in error-correcting codes

27 minutes ago

Error-correcting codes are one of the glories of the information age: They're what guarantee the flawless transmission of digital information over the airwaves or through copper wire, even in the presence of the corrupting ...

Hide and seek: Sterile neutrinos remain elusive

1 hour ago

The Daya Bay Collaboration, an international group of scientists studying the subtle transformations of subatomic particles called neutrinos, is publishing its first results on the search for a so-called ...

Recommended for you

Motion capture examines dance techniques

Sep 29, 2014

WAAPA dance students are set to take part in a world-first biomechanical study that tracks their training, technique and injuries as they develop as professional performers.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

nyscof
1 / 5 (1) Dec 01, 2007
Modern science shows that adding fluoride chemicals into the drinking water is ineffective at reducing tooth decay, harmful to health and a waste of tax dollars.

Take Action to End Fluoridation at
http://www.FluorideAction.Net.

1200 Professionals signed a statement calling for an end to water fluoridation and the beginning of Congressional hearings to discern why government employees keep pushing fluoridation in the face of mounting evidence of harm