Software Piracy Fight Makes Enemies

Nov 25, 2007 By BRIAN BERGSTEIN, AP Technology Writer
Software Industry Group Aims at Piracy (AP)
This graphic shows breakdown of revenue and expenses for the Business Software Alliance.

(AP) -- Michael Gaertner worried he could lose his company. A group called the Business Software Alliance had written him to claim that his 10-person architectural firm in Galveston, Texas, was using unlicensed software.



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User comments : 7

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nilbud
2.4 / 5 (5) Nov 25, 2007
Anyone stupid enough not to be using open source deserves everything they get.
pravuil
2.5 / 5 (2) Nov 25, 2007
Anyone stupid enough not to be using open source deserves everything they get.

Sad as it is, you couldn't be more right.
surja
4.3 / 5 (3) Nov 25, 2007
I think it really is time that people considered open source to be a viable and trouble free alternative. They will save from wasting money on overpriced and often under productive software and also avoid the hound like attitudes of the so called software giants who don't really care about anyone. Leave them be and join the open source movement. See how different things are.
Sirussinder
3.5 / 5 (2) Nov 25, 2007
I couldn't agree more, the more they fight and demand crazy license fees on overpriced software, which you cant return if its junk and is outdated every few years, is pushing me closer to open source once and for all.
fredrick
3.7 / 5 (3) Nov 25, 2007
For many businesses, open-source has seemed technically daunting or unable to match the proprietary programs seen as essential in some industries.


Open Source isn't always a viable alternative.

And no, not using open source doesn't make one stupid, nor does it mean that they deserve the huge financial hit of an overpriced lawsuit... what an absurd thing to say.
CWFlink
not rated yet Nov 26, 2007
"Software as a Service" is a model that should be considered... Don't buy and install software, confusing "licensing" with "ownership"... In the long run, software is only worthwhile if it is evolving to better serve the needs of the user as those needs (and supporting technology) evolve.

Recognize you are not "buying" Windows XYZ... you are actually paying for the development of the next generation of the product. That, and support, is where the real costs are.

Consumers and vendors may well benefit from a new model for the software industry that recognizes the real economics of the industry.

Next time you want to start a software business, think about making it server-based. You keep your software on your server and provide the functionality beneficial to the end-user. It changes the security model, the investment model and the support model.... but offers a new way to truly serve your customer base rather than throw "licensed" products over a wall and wonder why the customer on the other side is angry!
Reaper6971
not rated yet Nov 26, 2007
"...Its CEO says software licenses aren't as difficult as many users contend..."

Apparently he's never tried to navigate the labyrinthine Windows Server licensing model.

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